Elise Mignot LINGUISTIQUE ANGLAISE Exercices corrigé · PDF fileElise Mignot...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    14-Sep-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    235
  • download

    2

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Elise Mignot LINGUISTIQUE ANGLAISE Exercices corrigé · PDF fileElise Mignot...

  • Elise Mignot

    LINGUISTIQUE ANGLAISE

    Exercices corrigs

    1. Exercices de description grammaticale

    Ces exercices portent sur la premire partie de louvrage.

    1.1. Exercice sur la nature des mots

    Cet exercice porte sur le chapitre 1.

    Indiquez la nature des mots souligns dans le texte ci-dessous. Justifiez et commentez.

    Conseil de mthode : noubliez pas dutiliser les diffrents critres (smantique, morphologique, syntaxique) chaque fois que cela est possible et pertinent.

    And when we get there?

    Well, we wait. I made Bunnys walk to the ravine from school twice this afternoon, there and back,

    and timed it both ways. Itll take him at least half an hour from the time he leaves his room. Which

    gives us plenty of time to go around the back way and surprise him.

    What if he doesnt come?

    Well, if he doesnt, weve lost nothing but time.

    What if one of us goes with him?

    He shook his head. Ive thought of that, he said. Its not a good idea. If he walks into the trap

    himself alone, of his own volition theres not much way it can be traced to us.

    If this, if that, said Francis sourly. This sounds pretty haphazard to me.

    We want something haphazard.

    I dont see whats wrong with the first plan.

    The first plan is too stylized. Design is inherent in it through and through.

    But design is preferable to chance.

    Henry smoothed the crumpled map against the table with the flat of his palm. There, youre wrong,

    he said. If we attempt to order events too meticulously, to arrive at point X via a logical trail, it

    follows that the logical trail can be picked up at point X and followed back to us. But luck? Its

    invisible, erratic, angelic. What could possibly be better from our point of view, than allowing Bunny

    to choose the circumstances of his own death?

    Everything was still. Ouside, the crickets shrieked with rhythmic, piercing monotony.

    Francis his face moist and very pale bit his lower lip. Let me get this straight. We wait at the

    ravine and just hope he happens to stroll by. And if he does, we push him off right there in broad

    daylight and go back home. Am I correct?

  • More or less, said Henry.

    What if he doesnt come by himself? What if somebody else wanders by?

    Its no crime to be in the woods on a spring afternoon, Henry said. We can abort at any time, up to

    the moment he goes over the edge. And that will only take an instant. If we happen across anybody on

    the way to the car I think it improbable, but if we should we can always say theres been an

    accident, and were going for help.

    But what if someone sees us?

    I think that extremely unlikely, said Henry, dropping a lump of sugar into his coffee with a splash.

    But possible.

    Anything is possible, but probability will work for us if only we let it, said Henry. What are the

    odds that some previously undetected someone will stumble into that very isolated spot, during the

    precise fraction of a second it will take to push him over?

    It might happen.

    Anything might happen, Francis. He might be hit by a car, and save us all a lot of trouble.

    A soft, damp breeze, smelling of rain and apple blossom, blew through the window. I had broken out

    in a sweat without realizing it and the wind on my cheek made me feel clammy and light-headed.

    Donna Tartt, The Secret History, 1992.

    Rponses

    The (the ravine)

    Cest un dterminant, plus prcisment un article dfini, donc un mot appartenant une classe

    lexicale ferme. Il se situe juste avant un nom, ravine, quil dtermine, cest--dire quil en

    rduit le potentiel de rfrence. On parle dun ravin particulier, connu de lnonciateur et de

    ses co-nonciateurs, dans un lieu particulier. Larticle the code dailleurs ce reprage par

    rapport lnonciateur (le fait que lexistence du ravin est connue).

    Timed (I made Bunnys walk to the ravine from school twice this afternoon, there and back,

    and timed it both ways.)

    Il sagit dun verbe, plus prcisment un verbe lexical (et non auxiliaire), qui appartient donc

    une classe lexicale ouverte. Ce verbe est conjugu la premire personne du singulier I ; il

    porte la marque du prtrit, en loccurrence un suffixe flexionnel (-ed). Il dit une relation

    (entre une personne, un trajet, et un outil tel quune montre ou un chronomtre), et suit le

    sujet, comme cela est le cas dans lordre canonique de la proposition (le sujet nest en ralit

    pas rpt mais est implicite : I made Bunnys walk and [I] timed it both ways.

    Which (Itll take him at least half an hour from the time he leaves his room. Which gives us

    plenty of thime to go around the back way and surprise him.)

    Il sagit dun pronom relatif, dont lantcdent est toute une proposition (qui reprsente en fait

    lintgralit de la phrase qui prcde : Itll take him at least half an hour from the time he

    leaves his room. Les pronoms relatifs sont souvent des mots en wh- ; cest le cas ici. Le

    pronom occupe une fonction lintrieur de la subordonne relative : il est sujet. Il appartient

    une classe lexicale ferme.

    Volition (Its not a good idea. If he walks into the trap himself alone, of his own volition

    theres not much way it can be traced to us.)

    Ce mot est un nom, il appartient donc une classe lexicale ouverte. Sa terminaison en tion

    en est typique (on ne peut pas parler ici de suffixe car on ne peut dcomposer le mot en base +

    suffixe, mais la terminaison reste caractristique des noms). Il est prcd dun dterminant

    (his), et dun adjectif qualificatif (own). Ce nom permet de dire une ide abstraite.

  • Sourly (If this, if that, said Francis sourly. This sounds pretty haphazard to me.)

    Ce mot est un adverbe, il appartient une classe lexicale ouverte. Le suffixe drivationnel ly

    est typique de la classe des adverbes ; il permet de driver des adverbes partir dadjectifs, ici

    sour. Cet adverbe modifie la relation prdicative /He - say/, il en dit la manire. Cet adverbe

    est gradable (very sourly est possible), tout comme ladjectif dont il est driv.

    Flat (Henry smoothed the crumpled map against the table with the flat of his palm.)

    Il sagit ici dun nom, qui appartient donc une classe lexicale ouverte, prcd dun

    dterminant (the). Le mme mot pourrait, dans un autre contexte, tre adjectif qualificatif. Le

    nom est issu de ladjectif flat par drivation zro (ou conversion). Il ne dit pas une qualit

    (quon ne pourrait se reprsenter que comme lie un rfrent), comme le ferait ladjectif,

    mais une entit concrte (une partie du corps, plus prcisment une partie de la main).

    You (There, youre wrong, he said).

    Ce mot est un pronom, il appartient une classe lexicale ferme. Plus prcisment, il sagit

    dun pronom personnel de deuxime personne. Il a un antcdent : la personne qui vient de

    parler, le co-nonciateur. Il rfre un participant de la situation dnonciation.

    Invisible (But luck? Its invisible, erratic, angelic.)

    Il sagit dun adjectif qualificatif, qui appartient donc une classe lexicale ouverte. Sa

    morphologie (terminaison en ble), en est typique. Ladjectif est par ailleurs li

    syntaxiquement it par lintermdiaire de be, verbe quatif (il est attribut du sujet, une

    fonction typique des adjectifs). Dun point de vue smantique, il dit une qualit du rfrent

    (dit par luck) ; il est li ce rfrent.

    Plus prcisment, il sagit dun adjectif descriptif. Il nappartient pas vraiment aux catgories

    de lacronyme TAFCOM (taille, ge, forme, couleur, origine, matire), mais il se rapproche le

    plus de la couleur : invisible dit quon ne voit pas on est donc dans le domaine de la vision

    (les couleurs se voient). Il est compatible avec les diffrentes fonctions possibles des adjectifs

    (attribut, pithte, apposition), car il dit une signification focalisable. On peut attirer

    lattention sur le fait que le rfrent est invisible. Il sagit bien en effet dattirer lattention, car

    en ralit tout le monde sait que la chance (une ide abstraite) est invisble (ce sont les

    manifestations de lide abstraite qui sont visibles). Lnonciateur attire lattention de son

    interlocuteur sur ce point car il veut le convaincre. Notons enfin que cet adjectif nest pas

    gradable : on ne peut pas dire *very invisible. Ceci sexplique par le fait que la signification

    adjectivale nest pas situe sur un continuum : soit quelque chose est visible, soit il ne lest

    pas, surtout dans le cas dune ide abstraite telle que luck. Il ne fait pas de doute que la chance

    est invisible, elle ne peut pas tre partiellement visible.

    What (What could possibly be better from our point of view, than allowing Bunny to choose

    the circumstances of his own death?)

    What est ici un pronom interrogatif. Il appartient une classe ferme. Sa morphologie en wh-

    indique un vide dinformation combler, ce qui est minement compatible avec le fait de

    poser une question.

    No (Its no crime to be in the woods on a spring afternoon, Henry said.)

    No est ici un dterminant, qui appartient une classe lexicale ferme. Il prcde un nom

    (crime), et donne un renseignement sur lactualisation du rfrent. Cest en effet la non

    actualisation (non existence) de crime qui est dite.

  • To (to the car)

    Ce mot fait partie de la classe lexicale des prpositions, classe ferme. La prposition exprime

    une relation, a un sens spatial (mouvement vers), ce qui est typique des prpositions, et

    introdui